Monday, June 12, 2017

Cover Reveal - Where Your Heart Meets God's by Flora Reigada

Flora Reigada may be new to the MillerWords family, but she is no stranger to writing. In her how-to devotional, she asks if your life feels incomplete? Well, maybe you can find the answer you've been missing...

Where Your Heart Meets God's


About the Book: God has life changing messages for you, but how would you know, and what would He say? You might be surprised to find His words shining like jewels in everyday life, but also where we need to search and dig. Recognizing these messages of life and love can be compared to discovering hidden treasures just for you, then exploring these jewels one at a time, each with numerous facets. Such is the divine treasure with your name, if you will but receive. Where Your Heart Meets God’s can help illuminate these inner riches right where you are, whatever your circumstances or struggles. Open the pages and your heart for an everlasting adventure in hearing and experiencing God. Discover the many ways He is calling your name.

About the Author: Flora Reigada is an award-winning journalist and novelist. She and her husband, Dan, have been a reporter/photographer team for several newspapers, including the Florida Today. At present, they cover Brevard County/Space Coast news for Senior Life newspaper. Interesting places they have explored in pursuit of a story include a “castle,” the Castillo de San Marcos in St. Augustine, Florida. In Titusville Florida’s historic Vassar B. Carlton Courthouse, they climbed a hidden stairway to a long-abandoned jail. While covering events at a local ranch, Flora narrowly avoided being trampled by a “spooked” horse. She has also been a staff writer for Warner Press, contributing to their Pathways to God devotional and Christian Art Bulletin. In addition, she has written for Guideposts Magazine, Decision Magazine, the Upper Room Daily Devotional and more. She and Dan are proud parents and grandparents.

“Our lives have been filled with adventure,” Flora says.

Where Your Heart Meets God's is coming soon from MillerWords on all major eBook readers!

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Wednesday, June 7, 2017

Cover Reveal - South Dakota by JAX

JAX delivers the second story of the Inward Dwelling series with this cover reveal.


South Dakota takes place with some of the same characters from Many Gray Horses, but it is a few years earlier than the first installment.

About the Book: 1973, South Dakota. The historic site of a massacre some 80 years before. History repeats itself, they say. And before he was someone's father, he was a young man, a college student, and trying to find his own identity. Along with a few friends, this young man begins a journey into the unknown. The town of Wounded Knee is at the end of the road, but that is not his final destination.

About the Author: JAX lives and writes in the U.S. He divides his time between Montana and the American Southwest. He has also traveled to many parts of the world including the UK, Europe, the Middle East and Asia and he hasn't done it as part of a tourist package. His keen interest in Native American culture has taken him across America as well. Story telling is at the heart of what he does and he uses it to explore the clash as well as the connection between the various peoples of the North American continent. Many Gray Horses is his first work of fiction.

South Dakota is now available for $0.99
on the following eReaders:





BN Nook - Coming Soon!

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Monday, March 20, 2017

Review - Petals by Murray Pura


Murray took a chance.

Murray Pura is known for his Amish and Romance novels. He is a best-seller and has won multiple awards. With Petals, Murray took a chance on a different kind of writing. Petals is a collection of poems that tend to be quite personal and more than a little emotional. Murray took a chance outside of his norm and it paid off in the form of a 5-star review.


Petals by Murray Pura is available from MillerWords in paperback and Kindle - click HERE to purchase.

Here is the complete article by reviewer and poet Jim Bennett:

twenty-five powerful poems

five stars

I will give you a quote from the introduction, which is in prose, to provide a first feel for Pura’s descriptive power: “Aunt Helen would bring me intricately decorated eggs at Easter. Whenever I visited her home it was like visiting a foreign country – icons with dark eyes brooded on the walls, pickles and dill floated like pike among lake weed in huge glass jars, pictures of the Pope blessing a crowd and of Jesus opening his chest to a Sacred Heart mingled with a photograph of her father, my grandfather and namesake, lying in his coffin, hands clasped on his chest.”

You will be ambushed by the poem Cottonwoods, which begins thus: “if there are cottonwoods in Ukraine /they will tell different stories //mine speak of the buffalo and the Blackfoot /jade waters wind about their roots /and have their own words...” which leads to a surprise gut-punch ending.

Belonging and alienation are weirdly captured in She Traced my Body on Paper, which begins thus: “She traced my body on paper /And ignored the chill I felt on my skin /As she moved her pencil down my neck /Over my shoulders and down past my heart //Over the pattern of my life...”

I have too many favourites here to mention them all, so I’ll skip to The Girl at the Airport, which is sort-of a love poem told amidst the horror of war, including these fragments: “i met Savella where /smoke wound like the black dreams you cannot remember /but which are snaked too tight to leave your mind...” and later “we fought for the airport by Donetsk /where she held an assault rifle /and it was the shattering and breaking of men...” and “I saw the liquid around her eyes /and the current beneath her skin...” and “killing became kisses /wounds gave way to passions /she had no english /it made no difference...” Now if you think that’s a spoiler, turn to the poem and let Pura tell you the rest of it. You will be surprised.

No carps in this review. No typos. Nothing but powerful imagery and strong experiences.

I will conclude by mentioning War House, which begins thus: “I have seen houses /Where the only things moving /Were shirts and pants pinned to a clothesline /Flipping up and over in a blue sky wind...” Here the tragedy of being caught in a war is described with brutal simplicity.

For me, star counts are hard. I try to be consistent. My personal guidelines, when doing an ‘official’ KBR review, are as follows: five stars means, roughly equal to best in genre. Rarely given. Four stars means, extremely good. Three stars means, definitely recommendable. I am a tough reviewer. This time, five stars was an easy decision. Enjoy. Pura stands among the great writers of descriptive experience.

Kindle Book Review Team member.

(Note: this reviewer received a free copy of this book for an independent review. He is not associated with the author or Amazon.)


About the Book: This is the story of a war. But it is also a story of human love and beauty and faith that the sun will rise again over a nation torn by terrible conflict. If a novel is like live streaming or Netflix, then poetry is a gallery of HD images taken with your iPhone or Nikon DSLR, each picture sharp and crystalline and rich with color and meaning, etched in your mind forever thanks to its precision and brilliance. This is a small book of such high definition images, vivid snaps of one man's journey through the recent military conflict in Ukraine. People's faces are here, fields of flowers are here, impossibly blue skies and sharp suns, roads and streets and windows that remain perfectly intact even though the rest of the house has been blown to pieces. Love is here, and peace sits in the same room as pain, while hope has more strength than killing or death. The man's words are beautiful and true and, as real as the war he fights is, dawn and tomorrow are more real. Parts of it will tell your story. Parts of it will become your story. Parts of it will take you on a journey you never expected to take. That is the power of poetry in motion. Begin at this man's beginning.

About the Reviewer: Jim Bennett is a poet: five volumes available here; and published in The Fiddlehead, Event, The New Quarterly, and Prairie Fire. Jim started writing poetry in high school, thought a handwritten poem had been created by a student who’d sat in the same desk earlier that day. Mentored by one English teacher, and rekindled by Richard Ketchum, Jim never looked back. Jim Bennett is an unlikely poet: M.Sc. in Pure Mathematics, programmer, designer, and application architect at IBM, CIBC, and SimVest Solutions, you’d expect a techie’s techy and be correct. Still, Jim has varied interests and views his career(s) as funding for himself, his wife, their children, and writing. (Poets rarely get rich by their poems; Jim suspected this and directed his efforts accordingly). Jim takes pictures; images on jim-bennett.ca are his, and cover images on his last three volumes. He keeps tropical fish, but is not expert. Jim Bennett is a poet. Everything else is secondary, except his wife and children.

To see more titles from this publisher, search "MillerWords" on Amazon Kindle. To see more from author Murray Pura, please visit: Murray Pura Writing on Facebook. Jim Bennett reviews for the site Kindle Book Review and has his own blog at http://jim-bennett.ca

Monday, March 13, 2017

5 Questions - Joy Ross Davis

The 5 Questions today are for Joy Ross Davis. Her story The Beggar's Miracle is available exclusively on Amazon Kindle from MillerWords. Click here to get it: https://goo.gl/jSnkyf


MW: The Beggar's Miracle tells the story of an orphan named Bitty Brown. Often, an author identifies with or connects with their main character. What does Bitty Brown mean to you?

JRD: Ah, Bitty Brown. I am a student of Irish history. During one of my rounds of study, I came across an article about a trial in Ireland (2013) in which the proprietors of a state-run orphanage were charged with abuse. I delved into the subject and discovered many accounts orphans who were sold to Americans. From there, I did more research into the daily activities of the "Laundries" as they became known (owing to the laundry they took in from citizens, most of which contained piles of bills to pay for getting a child). Because many families wanted infants, many of the children sold to Americans were the products of sexual abuse of the young women (16 and older) who remained in the Laundries. Bitty Brown represents all of the children who were mistreated and abused at the Laundries. The study of the laundries touched my heart so deeply that I knew I had to write about it. The name Bitty Brown came to me while I showered, and I knew at that moment that she would be the girl who would tell the story of the Laundries.

MW: So, it is quite a personal story. With the story set in Ireland, your connection goes a little deeper. Your writing shows that you've been to the Emerald Isle, you must love it. How many times have you been?

JRD: I've been to Ireland four times. During my first trip there, I worked as a travel writer for Tourism Ireland for six months. I traveled across the country finding exciting places and writing about them. Along the way, I forged friendships with many people in Ireland. That was in 2003. I've been back three times, and I'm sure I'll go again. Ireland calls to me, and I feel as if my heart's home is there. I have a dream of living there one of these days.

MW: That could be a real possibility! Writers tend to live on dreams, so we wish you the best in fulfilling yours. Now to switch gears from dreams to nightmares, it seems that the "laundries" had truly horrible conditions. Does anything like that still exist in Ireland today?

JRD: The Laundries still operate today in Ireland. However, they are called Children's Homes, and only the oldest of the orphans can be assigned work duties. Strict governmental guidelines and regular inspections keep the homes running according to the law, but somehow, I believe that the practice of selling infants to foreign couples still flourishes, though I have no proof or evidence to support the belief.

MW: That sounds like the subject of a new book. I can already see Liam Neeson in the movie adaptation. He does have a particular set of skills. While you may not have Mr. Neeson in your book, you do have an element of the paranormal. How important is the paranormal in a Christian-themed story?

JRD: Virtually everything I write contains an aspect of the paranormal. Perhaps it is my attempt to have readers think beyond the worldly. With Bitty Brown, the beggar Jude and his dog are both paranormal entities without whom Bitty might not have survived her life on the streets. I've always had a strong belief in angels and spirits. An event from my childhood began this belief and has lasted my lifetime. I don't expect people to change their beliefs when they read one of my stories. I simply expect them to form a bond with the angel characters, to expand their imaginations and entertain possibilities. Without some form of paranormal aspect, my stories couldn't be told because at the heart of each one is the thought that angels exist. My hashtag on Twitter is #angelwriter. And that's what I want to be. I want to stir people with my quirky view of angels and their interactions with human beings.

MW: We have angels and orphans. That feels like an emotional story that could touch readers. As the author, why do you want people to read this story?

JRD: The greatest appeal of the story, to me, is that it offers hope to all who feel oppressed. It is a heart-warming story that affirms the idea that any one of us can become victims of circumstance, but we can all be rescued from those circumstances and given a new start. Bitty represents everyone who faces struggles and hardship. When two strangers approach her, she shies away at first. But those strangers offer her nothing but love. They provide a safe place for her, they give her a family, and they show her how to love in return. Hope, redemption, and the possibility of greatness come to Bitty Brown just as they can come to her readers.

MW: In the end, it is about hope. We can always use more of that. Thank you, Joy, for visiting with us today! The Beggar's Miracle is available now for ONLY $1.99.

Buy it HERE
or search for "MillerWords" on Kindle

Monday, February 6, 2017

Beggar's Miracle First Chapter

The Beggar's Miracle by Joy Ross Davis is available now, exclusively on Amazon Kindle for ONLY $1.99


Read the beginning of the story here:

Bitty Brown hid behind a stone pillar across the way from several large trash bins on High Street in Dungarran, bare feet tucked under a tattered dress she’d been given by the Sisters of Mercy Orphanage. She covered her head from the misting rain with a piece of canvas she’d taken from the orphanage’s laundry room.  One small rough hand gripped a worn bag she’d pilfered from one of the other girls. Inside this bag, she kept a treasure, a secret treasure she’d had since she was only four years old.
As darkness descended upon the small town, Bitty stood and looked down High Street to the right, then to the left. The shop keepers had turned off the lights, locked the doors, and left for home, and just as she’d hoped, the streets were now deserted as they were every Wednesday evening at six when people gathered for services at the Dungarran Church of Ireland.
Bitty had visited the church only two nights ago when Ireland’s cold winds cut through her like daggers. She’d thought she might freeze to death outside under her cardboard, and not wanting at that moment to die, she sought refuge in the church. Fearing that she would be thrown out, she hid behind the last row of pews. She sighed as she sat down, treasure in hand, on the thick rug. It felt so much better on her bare feet than the icy streets. She’d been warm there.
She decided that night to become a proper Christian someday.  
But then, the pastor came ‘round, a tall, good-looking young man wearing a black robe.
Bitty closed her eyes, curled herself into a tight ball, and waited for him to walk past. She heard his footsteps coming nearer, an odd sound, as if one foot fell a little lighter than the other.
Her heart pounded.
Then the footsteps stopped briefly.
Bitty did not open her eyes for fear the pastor would be standing beside her. He’d then toss her out, back on the streets.
She sighed quietly as she heard him walk past and into the small rectory office. When she heard the door close, she opened her blue eyes.  
Draped over the pew in front of her was a woman’s shawl. She hadn’t seen it when she’d first come in, but now, the thick fringed wool, unattended, proved too much to resist. Bitty picked it up carefully and wrapped it around her shoulders. She was small for her age, terribly undersized, even now at nineteen, so the shawl covered her from her shoulders to her feet. She rubbed her cold hands along the soft wool, hugged the shawl tightly over her and let her head fall back. She closed her eyes and tried to remember when she’d ever been this warm. Nothing came to mind, so she made a sign of the cross in thanks, slid under the pew, and fell fast asleep.



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Monday, January 30, 2017

Cover Reveal - Joy Ross Davis

MillerWords is pleased to announce their newest title:

The Beggar's Miracle

by Joy Ross Davis


Ms. Davis brings this previously released story to MillerWords in a brand new format with a touching new cover design.

About the book: Ice seemed to cover everything in Ireland from Dublin to Dungarran. It was a bad time to be homeless and a worse time to be an orphan.

Bitty Brown was both.

Bitty left the warmth of the Sisters of Mercy, deciding a life on the streets would be better than working seven days a week in the laundry, getting spots out of the clergy’s robes. Now she spent her nights huddled under a cardboard box, hoping to find her next meal in the nearby garbage cans. The kindness of Pastor Percy afforded her an old shawl to cover her shoulders.

She felt lost and alone with barely a memory of the comfort of her mother’s arms. Then she met Mr. Jones, a scruffy dog accompanied by an unusual beggar. Bitty sensed something strange about the beggar, something that could change her life.

Every night, she prayed for miracles. Could this be the miracle that would save Bitty Brown’s life?


About the author: Joy Ross Davis is a student of the lore and magic of the hills of Tennessee. She writes imaginative fiction featuring unusual angels as main characters. Her novel, Countenance, won a Silver Medal in an international readers’ contest. She has lived and worked in Alabama for most of her life.

The Beggar's Miracle will be available exclusively on Amazon Kindle this Friday, February 3rd.

See all of our titles in paperback and ebook by searching "MillerWords" on Amazon.




Friday, January 6, 2017

New Release - Murray Pura

Murray Pura delivers a story of love and survival that is about more than a war between nations


 “From the first sentence…to the last musings of its anti-hero, Beautiful Skin by Murray Pura takes [the reader] on an astonishing trip.” Patrick E. Craig, author of The Amish Heiress

Murray Pura is the author of more than a dozen novels, two collections of short stories, and several non-fiction titles including the Zondervan books Rooted and Streams, as well as the Baker devotional Majestic & Wild. His first novel was released in Toronto in 1988 and was a finalist for the Dartmouth Book Award. Pura has been a finalist for several awards in the US and Canada, including the $25,000 Kobzar Literary Award for his novel Zo. In 2012, Pura won the Word Award of Toronto for Best Historical Novel for The White Birds of Morning

His latest release is a novel titled Beautiful Skin published by MillerWords Publishing, a World War II Romance with more than meets the eye:

Principle character Andrew Chornavka and his family were caught up in the fires of the second great war. Love, betrayal, sacrifice, heroism, savagery, things amazing and miraculous were all part of this world, and the world of Chornavka’s brothers and sisters. Armies clashed and battles raged in the skies and on the ground. Yet the wars of the heart were no less fiery and painful, and the hunt to find hope and meaning within nations ripped apart by conflict, just as desperate as the struggle to survive. America, Canada, Ukraine, Russia, Poland, Germany and Berlin are the backdrop to a powerful drama of the human soul, to a story of a love that proved impossible to stop, a war that proved impossible to win and a faith that proved impossible to break.

According to the author, “My two aunts had a love-hate relationship that saw their family emigrate to Russia and Ukraine, where they were trapped by the German invasion and practically wiped out, even forced into slave labor in Berlin.”

This is a personal story for both the author and his characters. The real-life events of his family inspired the story. Pura considers himself to be an observer of the human experience, writing in almost every genre: Amish, suspense, adventure, war, romance, Western, historical fiction, literary fiction, even including nonfiction and academic in the areas of history, biography, spirituality, theology, inspirational, and memoirs. His goal as an author is to entertain, inspire and enlighten his readers. With Beautiful Skin, he accomplishes that, but also shares a piece of himself and his family’s history. He also wrote several original songs for the novel that capture the spirit of the Berlin jazz clubs of the time.

Pura adds, “This is a story where sisters are caught up in their own war of love and hate, and ultimately have to make a choice.”


Murray Pura was born and raised in Winnipeg, but now lives and writes in southwestern New Mexico. Beautiful Skin is his first novel with MillerWords and will be accompanied by a collection of original poems entitled Petals. Both books are available in paperback and Amazon Kindle beginning January 6th, 2017.

MillerWords is an independent publisher of positive and inspirational books for all ages that can be found online at www.MillerWords.com or on Facebook at FB.com/MillerWords.